Fuji film simulation portra 160

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Fuji film simulation portra 160

Every film photographer we know loves a bit of film stock comparison…at Canadian Film Lab we certainly do! And what difference does changing my exposure make? Our overall objective was to help photographers see the benefit of exposing their images well and avoiding underexposure, and to help give you a feel for the look of the different film stocks. All film was developed normally, with no push or pull processing. Full information on the metering technique used is at the bottom of this article.

In each case you can click on the image to see a full size version. This next shot is a great way to see the hugely important role that good exposure plays in the final look of your images.

Here we have Fuji H shot at 2 stops under box speed, and 2 stops over box speed:. We thought you might also like to see how each of the film stocks in our experiment, react to different exposures.

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Fuji H:. Portra And for the grand finale, ultra film geek experience…we shot a few other exposures too, ranging from 3 under to 4 over, for Fuji H, PortraPortra and Portra We wanted the comparison to be as direct as possible without getting into full blown controlled experiment territory! Where possible we kept our aperture at 2. We spot metered using an external light meter.

Our main aim was to correct the images as necessary in the scan and edit to create a neutral and pleasing skin tone. These lighting conditions are pretty much ideal, and the detrimental effects of underexposure in less than ideal light would be much worse than this. Another significant disadvantage of underexposing your images is that the results become more variable. Mixing exposures across your scene will also result in differences in your final image, and so despite the good latitude of film in good light, accurate and consistent metering is still highly desirable in terms of your final results.

Additional exposure will create a denser negative. And in full direct sun for example, you would definitely risk losing detail at the top end of the exposure range.Kodak introduced Portra film in As the name implies, this film was designed for portrait photography, as it produces pleasing skin tones.

It came in three ISO options:and In Kodak did away with the Neutral Color and Vivid Color options, making a new version that was more-or-less in-between the two. Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek recently created a Portra film simulation recipe for his Fujifilm X-E2, and he gave me permission to share his settings with you!

When I first looked at his pictures, I immediately thought that they resembled Portra, and I continued to think so as I used his recipe on my X-T1. Piotr has a lot of experience shooting film, and the main film that he uses is Portra How the film is shot, developed, and printed or scanned effects the way that it looks, so results can vary, but this recipe is overall an excellent facsimile of actual Portra film. Great job, Piotr Skrzypek! You can even try setting color to 0 to get a Portra NC look.

The other change I made is to white balance, which I set to Daylight, while Piotr uses auto-white-balance. I like Daylight a little more than AWB, but you can decide which you prefer for yourself.

fuji film simulation portra 160

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you! Great one! I always wondered if some pastel looking simulation would ever come… Finally! Like Like. I plan to make many more recipes for the older models. Maybe one will be similar to my Fujicolor Pro H overexposed, which has a pastel look.

fuji film simulation portra 160

Nice, thanks for sharing! I used Portra a lotespecially and NC. I used to expose it at half box speed i.

Damn, I miss it!Film presets are hugely popular these days, as the photography community as a whole has largely moved away from the crazy vibrant HDR editing that was all the rage when DSLRs first came out. I think this is mainly due to people wanting to capture a timeless style similar to the classic film stocks, leading to the development of many preset systems that try to do just that.

We tested 3 of the most popular film stocks from 3 systems so you can see for yourself how each one performs in a large variety of shooting scenarios. The RAW files were set to auto white balance and each preset was applied as a one click edit, no tweaking or adjusting.

These are the basic presets applied, though each system offers a variety of adjustments or alternate versions of each film stock.

This purpose of this test is two-fold; to compare various options for consumers and give an unbiased look at the results, and to see how our own presets compare to the best in the business. We're proud of the work that went into creating them and hope that you like what you see. These presets offer a very distinct look that some people consider the most accurate to their film counterparts.

fuji film simulation portra 160

I've always found they look a little too clean for the film look I'm after. The colors are vibrant and exposures are often flat, needing a bump in contrast and a drop in saturation. Fuji is my favorite preset from Mastin, but I don't like the blues and red tint to skin tones.

I often add a lot of contrast and tweak the HSL of these presets to get them closer to what I want, but the Fuji is a great starting point for bright scenes and exposures. Portra is my least favorite preset from this set of comparisons. I find the images flat with a very basic color toning that reminds me of in-camera profiles.

I don't recommend this preset, as it was my least favorite of the Portra's in every test. Mastin Lab's presets are intricately crafted to recreate film stocks accurately. But if they are the style you're looking for, they are a great choice for the consistency and bright tones. The Fuji set is my favorite, as it offers the best starting point for that style of editing. VSCO is perhaps the best known film preset maker, thanks in part to their hugely popular mobile app which is fantastic.

The presets are very hit or miss though, but when you do find one that fits your images you can apply it universally with great results. Fuji from VSCO is a fantastic portrait preset, mainly for it's golden brown skin tones. It's especially favorable compared to the red tones that come through in the Mastin Fuji preset. My main gripe with VSCO's Fuji is the green tones, they are pretty basic and often needed heavy tweaking to finish a photo. Portra from VSCO is a very neutral but pleasant portrait preset.

Portra is beloved by many wedding and portrait photographers, and I think a big part of that comes from it's versatility. It works in many circumstances, but the trade-off with the VSCO version is that it's pretty boring. It's a great starting point if you want the clean, bright, vibrant style, but just like the Mastin version, it will need an adjustment to the contrast and highlights as well.

Unfortunately, it is the worst suited for portrait work without heavy tweaking. The contrast and skin tones are all way too heavy and orange tinted. If you do landscape work though, this is a great one click edit thanks to it's vibrant but deep colors. If you want to tweak it for portraits, start with raising the luminance in the Orange channel to fix the skin tones and go from there.

This is a great value if you aren't sure about the style you're looking for, since you can try a variety. My favorite collection is 06, which features some of their most popular presets altered for a pushed and pulled film look.It was dark, contrasty, with low saturation and a blue-purple color cast.

I really liked the way that this picture looked. If you like those two, you might also appreciate this one. In the right situations, this recipe will give you a vintage analogue look with just the right range of expression. This recipe is compatible with all X-Trans IV cameras.

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See also: Film Simulation Recipes. Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it.

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Thank you! I get asked frequently to create film simulation recipes for all sorts of different looks. I received one such request recently that was a little unusual: the stills from the television series True Detective. The set photographer for this show is Michele K. The show itself was shot using Kodak Vision3 50D and T film. Michele likely photographed the stills with her Leica MP, and edited them to look like analog pictures. I looked and looked at different films to figure out what this aesthetic might be close to.

Some of you are going to really appreciate this film simulation recipe! You can get good results with this recipe when you over, under or correctly expose, but some of my favorite pictures were overexposed.

It seems especially well suited for high contrast scenes, although it can still be used in mid and low contrast scenes. I modified his settings very slightly, and published that Portra recipe for X-Trans II cameras last week. Portra is a line of films that Kodak introduced in Kodak made Portra in three different ISOs:and Portra has been a popular film since its introduction. This recipe looks great when you turn the exposure compensation dial up. This recipe is especially good for high-contrast scenes.

I imagine that for some of you, this will be the top film simulation recipe that you use most of the time. Kodak introduced Portra film in As the name implies, this film was designed for portrait photography, as it produces pleasing skin tones. It came in three ISO options:and In Kodak did away with the Neutral Color and Vivid Color options, making a new version that was more-or-less in-between the two. Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek recently created a Portra film simulation recipe for his Fujifilm X-E2, and he gave me permission to share his settings with you!

When I first looked at his pictures, I immediately thought that they resembled Portra, and I continued to think so as I used his recipe on my X-T1. Piotr has a lot of experience shooting film, and the main film that he uses is Portra How the film is shot, developed, and printed or scanned effects the way that it looks, so results can vary, but this recipe is overall an excellent facsimile of actual Portra film. Great job, Piotr Skrzypek! You can even try setting color to 0 to get a Portra NC look.

The other change I made is to white balance, which I set to Daylight, while Piotr uses auto-white-balance. I like Daylight a little more than AWB, but you can decide which you prefer for yourself.

My last film simulation recipe was modeled after a look by photographer Jeff Davenport.I liked the idea and thought it would be a fun challenge, so I agreed. I gave up a couple of times, but then some inspiration pushed me forward, and eventually I got it right.

Or, at least, very close to right. Portra is a daylight balanced color negative film made by Kodak. There have been four different versions made since it was introduced in the original filmNC and VCand the current version to present. As the name implies, this film is designed for portraits, and has a warm tint in order to enhance skin tones.

Being daylight balanced means if you use it on a cloudy day, indoors, under artificial light, etc. White balance became both the key to this film simulation recipe and the problem.

My favorite Fujifilm film simulation settings

Finally, I used Custom White Balancebut it took seven or eight different measurements before I got it right. I did get it right, though. The measurement that worked was out the back door of my house midday, slightly back-lit, partly cloudy with a lot of green in the scene. Interestingly enough, once I got it right I then tried to get the same custom white balance on my X-Pro2, but it measured slightly different. My suggestion is to use auto-white-balance, and once you capture an image that looks right, use custom white balance to make a measurement of the scene and set it.

I think that should work, anyway. Otherwise, just keep trying to get the custom white balance right by taking different measurements until you find one that looks good. Nailing down an exact Portra look is tricky business because it depends on which version of Portra film you are talking about, plus whether it was scanned and which scanner or printed and which chemicals and paper.

To verify that I was close, I put a couple of images through the RNI Films app on my phone using their Portra preset, and compared it to my Portra film simulation recipe.

It was very close, but who knows how accurate their Portra preset is and what exactly it is supposed to be simulating which film version and process.

fuji film simulation portra 160

I also examined images captured with actual Portra film. I think that the white balance shift gives the right color cast, but perhaps a bit too strongly.

Fujifilm Film Simulations Simplified

Sometimes I think that color should be at -2 and not -3, but -2 almost looks too saturated. The most difficult part of my Kodak Portra Film Simulation recipe will be getting the white balance correct. There are three custom white balance settings, and you can make three different ones and see which gives the best results. Just remember that Portra is a daylight balanced film, so measuring a daylight scene will give you a better chance of getting it right. I did slightly crop a couple of them, but no other adjustments were made, just minor cropping.

Click here for my complete list of Fujifilm XF film simulation recipes! Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it.Today we will look at some of those differences, as well as compare what is actually happening to these images using one film simulation over another, and how much difference there is between using a film simulation preset in camera vs in Lightroom.

This would not be the first Film Simulation mode comparison ever done, there are many out there. It is meant to produce the most true to life colors and can be used in a variety of situations. As you can see here based on the histograms, the Provia film simulation is doing quite a bit to the RAW file here.

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The original conversion was much darker, more like the RAW file. It was interesting to see such a difference in the perceived exposure between that of the Jpeg and the RAW file, considering both were captured at the same time, with the same settings. Note the differences in how the red, blue and green channel peaks in the highlights on the three versions. In the RAW they are way back in the midtones, while on the Camera jpg and Adobe jpg they are much more into the highlights.

Also note the difference between the Camera jpg and the Adobe jpg, they are very similar, but not identical. You could probably get them identical with some more tweaking, but I wanted to show this with as little meddling as possible. Velvia is the vivid color film simulation, perfect for landscapes and other situations where you want to pull a lot of saturation out of your colors. Generally not a great choice for portraits as it produces a pretty unnatural skin tone.

[Not] My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodak Portra 160 Film Simulation Recipe

Again, we see similar looks from the camera jpeg and the lightroom version, but not as close as the Provia. Specifically, if you look at those RGB peaks, you can see the camera jpeg shows a much taller narrower peak, while on the lightroom version you see they are wider and not as tall.

You can also see a pretty big difference in the highlights, which looks much better on the camera jpeg in my opinion.

Astia is the soft color film simulation. This is a great choice for portraits and other subjects where harsher contrast and color can take away from an image. More of the same here. A very similar look from the Adobe simulation, but not quite identical. The theme here is that the RGB mountains are wider and shorter than on the camera JPGs where they are narrower and taller.

Classic Chrome is meant to replicate the old chrome film stocks of the early film days. This one is reaaaaaallllly close, maybe even better than the Provia simulation in terms of the Adobe version of the edit. There are some very slight differences in the histogram, but not quite as significant as with the others.

However, besides that the overall look was nailed fairly well in my opinion. An ideal for portraits where you plan to post produce and color correct. This offers some slightly enhanced contrast across the board. Visually, this one is not bad, but as we can see via the histogram, the Adobe simulation is clipping a bit more on the green and yellows than the camera jpeg is. Another good choice for portraits and other subjects where you plan to do a lot of color correction and post production.

Similarly to the ProNeg Hi, this one offers a pretty close match to the camera profile as well. But again, the theme of slightly worse shadow and highlight control continues.

Again though, not enough of a difference in my opinion to worry about taking a ton of extra time to goof around with it in post, unless you figure out the exact differences and can reproduce them on every shot.

Then could make a preset to automatically offset the differences. A black and white look to mimic that classic Acros film stock, bumps up the details and increases the sharpness of your images. That classic old time style process, which depending on who you ask is either the best thing ever or the worst thing to ever happen to the world of image processing.Like so many other Fujifilm users out there, one of the main things that drew me into the X series system was the quality of their jpg files and the film simulations.

The colors and details are just stunning, and as someone who grew up with film photography in the 80s, the idea of having film simulations directly in the camera was just perfect!

That being said, as much as I appreciated the quality of the jpgs, I almost always ended up working on the raw files for the added post-processing flexibility and to get a more stylized look.

Choosing between them became an extremely time consuming task and it got to the point where I would sometimes spend over half-an-hour with a single photo going back and forth between different looks.

Earlier in I realized that I should really spend less time editing and more time shooting, so I decided to use the jpgs instead of the raw files as much as possible. This site was a real game changer, as it allowed me to emulate directly in the camera many of the looks that I was trying to recreate using Lightroom presets.

One of the things that I was also hoping to achieve by shooting jpg was to get a more consistent look in my photos, but looking back that never really happened because I kept changing back and forth between all of those recipes! Something that I realized from using his simulations is that the biggest defining factor in the final look of the jpg is the Auto White Balance shift applied.

Back when the X-Pro3 was announced I was very skeptical on some of the hardware design changesbut one thing that immediately got me excited was the jpg-oriented software updates and specifically the new Classic Negative film simulation. After much trial and error, I settled on the settings below that I used almost exclusively on the X-Pro1 during the time that I had it:.

When it comes to monochrome images, I still use the same recipe that I came up with once I upgraded to an X-trans III camera some years years ago. This works particularly well with older legacy lenses, because of their natural imperfections compared to current lenses.

While most of the times I use the camera jpgs instead of the raw files, I still run them through Capture One to do some quick adjustments. I have a custom user style that I apply upon importing the jpgs, which does the following:. The differences compared to the original jpg are pretty subtle, as you can see on this example left is the original, edit on the right :. This workflow has dramatically reduced my editing time on the computer and also helped me to focus on getting things right in camera, instead of shooting mindlessly and hopping to fix it in post.

And of course there are plenty of situations especially for those doing professional paid work where the flexibility of Raw is a must.

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